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    Thread: Help needed with Night Portrait Photography.

    1. #1
      Pg Xtremist

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      Help needed with Night Portrait Photography.

      Asalam o Alaikum!

      I own Nikon D5300 with following lenses and accessories.

      1) Nikon 35mm 1.8G
      2) Nikon 18-140mm AF-S
      3) Nikon 70-300mm AF-S VR
      4) Yongnuo Speedlite YN565EX (external Flash)
      5) Wireless Remote
      6) Tripod

      I intend to take my night portraits with "BOOKEH" effects on the rooftop of my house. I'm posting some pictures here so that you guys can understand what kind of portraits I want.

      1) night portraits - Google Search

      2) night portraits - Google Search

      3) night portraits - Google Search

      4) night portraits - Google Search

      5) night portraits - Google Search

      I hope you all must have understood what I'm trying to explain! Please let me know the correct steps and guide me if I should invest in a light system/setup or any special lens for these kind of photos?

      P.S There would be no one to help me whilst I take a portrait of my self so please bear that in mind that I have to do all the work myself.

      Waiting for your kind reply.

      Thanks.

    2. #2
      Don Vito Corléone
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      You have the lens that'd do that. Ie, 35mm 1.8G.

      Just keep the f value to 1.8. ISO probably according to the lighting. And that's it. Make sure you have sources of light behind you (Street lights, that omit light). And you WILL need someone to take your pictures.

      Sent from my Moto X Pure

    3. #3
      Pg Xtremist

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      I'll open the Aperture wide but as far as i know that the light should hit the subject in order to be in focus. How can i set the ISO according to lighting?
      Please guide me the way to avoid noise as well.

    4. #4
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      Quote Originally Posted by mindkill3r View Post
      I'll open the Aperture wide but as far as i know that the light should hit the subject in order to be in focus. How can i set the ISO according to lighting?
      Please guide me the way to avoid noise as well.

      check this :


      The Art of Compromise


      Each of these three exposure parameters can be adjusted in standardised increments called "stops". Modern cameras usually allow for adjustments in smaller 1/3 stop increments for any of these three exposure variables.
      To compensate for any change in one of these settings and maintain correct exposure, you will need to compensate by adjusting one of the other exposure settings by the same amount.
      For example, if you increase the ISO setting by one stop, you will need to compensate for this by "stopping down" (decreasing by one stop) either the aperture or shutter speed settings to maintain correct exposure. You could alternatively adjust both aperture and shutter speed by half a stop each... it's all about equilibrium and the art of compromise.

      The relationship between the three exposure variables displayed in single stop increments. As you increase exposure by one stop, you get a doubling of the amount of light being exposed in your image. Conversely, decreasing exposure by one stop results in a halving of the amount of light being exposed.
      To get correct exposure, you need to know how to interpret the metered exposure reading from your camera and select the correct type of metering for the particular subject you intend to shoot. This is a crucial part of getting consistently well-exposed images.
      Modern digital cameras also provide you with a plethora of tools like a histogram display which assist in getting correct exposure, and I find these exposure aids very useful. The real payoff to understanding exposure control, however, is the ability to select optimised settings in a way that complements the subject matter you are shooting.
      Night photography is no different, and I generally stick to a set of guidelines that I know work well for the majority of images I shoot within this discipline.
      I will delve into using your camera's exposure meter and some of the other exposure tools and camera settings in my forthcoming article on shooting night photography in manual exposure mode.




      basically the "art" of photography is to play with setting to capture the correct amount of light you want to capture.

      setting a lower iso with a tripod stand is going to help you in capturing low noise photos and higher quality pics, but you need to set it with movement of the subject and smaller shutter speed.


      a fantastic article on understanding iso is : Understanding ISO - A Beginner's Guide
      Likes mindkill3r liked this post
       



    5. #5
      Pg Xtremist

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      Quote Originally Posted by NaNoW View Post
      check this :





      basically the "art" of photography is to play with setting to capture the correct amount of light you want to capture.

      setting a lower iso with a tripod stand is going to help you in capturing low noise photos and higher quality pics, but you need to set it with movement of the subject and smaller shutter speed.


      a fantastic article on understanding iso is : Understanding ISO - A Beginner's Guide
      Thanks Buddy!

     

     

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